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Just Facts is dedicated and determined to provide factual, documented information to the people of Illinois, educating them on the real risks involved and societal impact of legalization of cannabis.

Marijuana use linked to increase risk of strokes: study

New research is being presented at a conference in Montreal Friday linking recreational cannabis use with an increased risk of stroke.

The study, being outlined at the World Stroke Congress, looked at five years of hospital statistics from the United States.

Researchers found the incidence of stroke rose steadily among marijuana users, even though the overall rate of stroke remained constant over the same period.

The study examined 2.3 million hospitalizations between 2010 and 2014 among people who used cannabis recreationally.

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Global News. “Marijuana use linked to increase risk of strokes: study” http://www.globalnews.ca. 19 October 2018 Web. 6 December 2018

Canada’s Message to Teenagers: Marijuana Is Legal Now. Please Don’t Smoke It.

Parents and grandparents jammed the small hall of Thornbury, a sleepy ski town north of Toronto, to glean tips on how to talk to their teenagers about the potential harms of marijuana.

Held less than a week before Canada was set to legalize cannabis, the public health session had a message for parents: Marijuana would be legal for adults, but it was not safe for young people. And parents needed to instill in their children the idea that pot could be dangerous.

“It’s been proven the brain doesn’t stop growing until you are 25, and yet we’re legally selling it to people at 19,” Jenny Hanley, an addictions counselor, said as she left the meeting. “What the hell is our government thinking?”

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The New York Times. “Canada’s Message to Teenagers: Marijuana Is Legal Now. Please Don’t Smoke It.” http://www.nytimes.com. 11 November 2018 Web. 4 December 2018

Chronic pot use may have serious effects on the brain, experts say

As marijuana legalization builds momentum across the United States — with Michigan becoming the latest state to allow recreational use by adults — researchers are warning that more studies are needed on the long-term effects of chronic pot smoking on the human brain.

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, but little is known about its effect on health or how addictive it is.

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INBC News. “Chronic pot use may have serious effects on the brain, experts say” http://www.nbcnews.com. 11 November 2018 Web. 29 November 2018

Crashes rise in first states to begin legalized retail sales of recreational marijuana

Crashes are up by as much as 6 percent in Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington, compared with neighboring states that haven’t legalized marijuana for recreational use, new research from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) shows. The findings come as campaigns to decriminalize marijuana gain traction with voters and legislators in the U.S., and Canada begins allowing recreational use of marijuana this month.


Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. “Crashes rise in first states to begin legalized retail sales of recreational marijuana” http://www.iihs.org. 18 October 2018 Web. 27 November 2018

Teens who’ve tried marijuana have used it in more than one form

Most teens who’ve tried marijuana have used the drug in more than one form, including cannabis products that are smoked, eaten or vaped, new USC research shows.

The study, published Friday in JAMA Network Open, raises concerns about adolescent health amid a booming cannabis market that touts sleekly packaged products claiming an array of health benefits.

“Cannabis use in adolescence increases risk for chronic use throughout adulthood, addiction and impaired cognitive development,” said the study’s senior author, Adam Leventhal, professor of preventive medicine and psychology and director of the USC Health, Emotion and Addiction Laboratory at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

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Science Daily. “Teens who’ve tried marijuana have used it in more than one form” http://www.sciencedaily.com. 28 September 2018 Web. 21 November 2018

UICOMP Study on Synthetic Cannabinoids Featured in New England Journal of Medicine

A research article detailing a central Illinois poison outbreak involving synthetic cannabinoids earlier this year and the therapy provided is featured in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

A study involving 34 patients at OSF HealthCare Saint Francis Medical Center between March and April of 2018 were identified as having synthetic cannabinoid-associated bleeding disorders. Of those patients tested, superwarfarin, a lethal class of toxins, and more specifically, brodifacoum, commonly used to kill rats, was confirmed present in all. Symptoms were controlled with vitamin K replacement therapy. One patient in the series report died from complications of spontaneous brain hemorrhage. While the study reported on 34 patients, over 100 cases were reported in the Peoria/Pekin area.

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The University of Illinois College of Medicine. “UICOMP Study on Synthetic Cannabinoids Featured in New England Journal of Medicine” http://www.peoria.medicine.uic.edu. 27 September 2018 Web. 20 November 2018

Secondhand Marijuana Smoke

Health risks of exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke: Peer-reviewed and published studies do indicate that exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke may have health and safety risks for the general public, especially due to its similar composition to secondhand tobacco smoke.

  • Secondhand smoke from combusted marijuana contains fine particulate matter that can be breathed deeply into the lungs, which can cause lung irritation, asthma attacks, and makes respiratory infections more likely. Exposure to fine particulate matter can exacerbate health problems especially for people with respiratory conditions like asthma, bronchitis, or COPD.
  • Significant amounts of mercury, cadmium, nickel, lead, hydrogen cyanide, and chromium, as well as 3 times the amount of ammonia, are found in mainstream marijuana smoke than is in tobacco smoke.
  • In 2009, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment added marijuana smoke to its Proposition 65 list of carcinogens and reproductive toxins, also known as the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986. It reported that at least 33 individual constituents present in both marijuana smoke and tobacco smoke are Proposition 65 carcinogens.
  • More Risks

No Smoke. “Secondhand Marijuana Smoke” http://www.no-smoke.org. Web. 12 November 2018

Young Canadians face heightened crash risk after consuming cannabis, new study finds

Young Canadians are more at risk of a vehicle crash even five hours after inhaling cannabis, according to results of a clinical trial conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University, and funded by the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA).

The research found that performance declined significantly, in key areas such as reaction time, even five hours after inhaling the equivalent of less than one typical joint.


Medical Xpress. “Young Canadians face heightened crash risk after consuming cannabis, new study finds” http://www.medicalxpress.com. 15 October 2018 Web. 8 November 2018

One Minute of Marijuana Secondhand Smoke Exposure Substantially Impairs Vascular Endothelial Function

One minute of exposure to marijuana SHS substantially impairs endothelial function in rats for at least 90 minutes, considerably longer than comparable impairment by tobacco SHS. Impairment of FMD does not require cannabinoids, nicotine, or rolling paper smoke. Our findings in rats suggest that SHS can exert similar adverse cardiovascular effects regardless of whether it is from tobacco or marijuana.


NCBI. “One Minute of Marijuana Secondhand Smoke Exposure Substantially Impairs Vascular Endothelial Function” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. 27 July 2018 Web. 6 November 2018

Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to try it at younger age

When mothers use marijuana during the first 12 years of their child’s life, their cannabis-using children are more likely to start at an earlier age than children of non-using mothers, according to a new study. This study is the first to establish a relationship between maternal cannabis use during a child’s lifetime and earlier initiation in a nationally-representative, longitudinal cohort.


ScienceDaily. “Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to try it at younger age” http://www.sciencedaily.com. 24 Sept 2018 Web. 1 November 2018